Disclaimer: This post might contain affiliate links. Using those links could result in me receiving a (financial) compensation from the advertised product or service. This is at no cost to you.
On this site I write about investing. Everything I write is my opinion. I don't give investment advice (nor financial advice in general). Always do your own research and make your own decisions.
Investing can be rewarding but it is not without risk. You can lose (a part of) your deposit.

I’m a Business Owner

And I own almost 6,500 businesses! These companies are spread across the globe and span every sector. Eat that, boss! 

These companies are divided between VWRL (3,144 companies) and IUSN (3,319 companies).

Now owning all these companies sounds like I’m the richest person in the world, but that’s not quite right. At the time of writing this, my portfolio is worth approximately 17,000 euros.

If we use the world equity markets as a proxy to how much the companies in VWRL and IUSN are worth, my share is a whopping 0.0000000002% of these companies. Yeah, I own almost nothing.

Investing in Index Funds

By buying shares in companies you become an owner of these companies, for a small part. With these shares, you will have a vote in some important decisions through the shareholders’ meeting and you are entitled getting part of the profit.

Now you could buy Apple stock with all your money and hope for the best, but that’s a big gamble. The next iPhone might flop and you’ll lose a lot of money.

It’s wiser to spread your investments across multiple stocks. The more the better, I would say. And the only practical way to do that is by investing in index funds.

These can be both mutual funds as well as exchange-traded funds or ETFs. I invest in two ETFs, but if you have access to mutual funds with low costs and broad coverage they’ll work as well.

Large and Small Cap

The reason I invest in these two products is that I want to have exposure to both large and small cap companies.

Large cap companies have a large market capitalisation. Small cap companies have a smaller capitalisation. Usually, large cap companies are more stable, grown companies, whereas small cap companies can be more volatile but also have more potential for growth.

Geographical Spread

Not only am I diversified across a lot of sectors, I’m also diversified across the globe.

And that brings a lot of upsides. If one country experiences an economic downturn, I don’t care. If one currency goes up or down, it doesn’t matter much. And the best upside is this:

indexbeleggen - wereldwijd
A truly world wide portfolio

In which companies do you invest?

4 thoughts on “I’m a Business Owner”

  1. Interesting post, can you share a little more about the how and where you do this? Sort of a small guide, explaining the steps you need to take to invest in these same companies? I think a lot of your readers would appreciate that!

    Reply
  2. Hi B, I’m curious for your motivation to buy IUSN. In the dutch FIRE scene, holding only VWRL is the standard. Do you know the costs of IUSN? From what I understand it’s not part of the ‘giro kernselectie’. So the costs could be quite high compared to VWRL.

    Reply
    • The costs of IUSN are 0.35% TER plus as you mentioned transaction costs with DeGiro. That’s why I don’t buy them every month, then the costs will simply be too much in relation to the 10% of my ETF portfolio IUSN makes up.
      IUSN does give me exposure to world-wide small-cap stocks, which is something interesting I think. Although at just 10% one might wonder if it even makes sense.

      Reply

Leave a comment